On Friday, January 27, 2017, President Trump issued Executive Order 13769 suspending entry into the United States of immigrants and non-immigrants from seven countries—Iran, Iraq, Libya, Somalia, Sudan, Syria and Yemen—for the next 90 days. Our international students, faculty and staff are valuable members of our University community and International Student and Scholar Services is here to support you in any way that we can.

We are monitoring the situation and will continue to update this page with new information and resources for students, faculty and scholars. International students and scholars with questions or concerns, contact International Student and Scholar Services at +1.919.962.5661 or isss@unc.edu. Additional contact information can be found on our contact page.

February 9: Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals Upholds Temporary Restraining Order on Executive Order 13769 .

NOTE: Due to the fluid nature of this situation non-immigrant students and scholars from the seven countries listed in the Executive Order should not travel out of the U.S. without consulting with an immigration attorney. Ongoing litigation could again block travel.

  1. Updates from UNC
  2. Events and Information Sessions
  3. U.S. Customs and Border Protection Q&A About Executive Order 13769
  4. Suspension of Visa Issuance
  5. Revocation of Existing, Valid Nonimmigrant and Immigrant Visa Stamps
  6. Travel Advisory
  7. Executive Orders
  8. Additional Resources

1. Updates from UNC

 

2. Events and Information Sessions

 

3. U.S. Customs and Border Protection Q&A about Executive Order 13769

On January 31st, in response to the question whether the Executive Order applies to green card holders from one of the seven countries listed, Customs and Border Protection (CBP) stated the following:

“Yes – if the green card holder (a Lawful Permanent Resident, or LPR) was out of the country at the time of the order’s signing, or travels out of the country after the order was signed. However, green card holders are eligible for national interest waivers consistent with the provisions of the Executive Order. It does not affect lawful permanent residents who are currently in the country.”

For a full list of questions and answers from CBP, visit the CPB website.

4. Suspension of Visa Issuance

As of the evening of January 27, 2017, all U.S. embassies and consular posts were instructed to immediately suspend the issuance of non-immigrant and immigrant visas for nationals of Iran, Iraq, Libya, Somalia, Sudan, Syria and Yemen. In addition, contractors have been instructed to cancel visa interviews for affected individuals.

According to a statement by the Department of State, “if you already have an appointment scheduled, please DO NOT ATTEND. You will not be permitted entry to the Embassy/Consulate. We will announce any other changes affecting travelers to the United States as soon as that information is available.” For more information, visit the Department of State website.

5. Revocation of Existing, Valid Nonimmigrant and Immigrant Visa Stamps

The Department of State, Bureau of Consular Affairs issued a directive announcing the provisional revocation of all valid nonimmigrant and immigrant visa stamps of nationals of Iraq, Iran, Libya, Somalia, Sudan, Syria and Yemen, with certain limited exception (A-1, A-2, G-1, G-2, G-3, G-4, NATO, C-2, or certain diplomatic visas). Please note that visa stamps only pertain to travel into the United States. If you have questions regarding this matter and/or how it might affect you, please contact our office.

6. Travel Advisory

February 9, 2017

Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals Upholds Temporary Restraining Order on Executive Order 13769

In a per curiam order Thursday,  the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals denied the federal government’s motion for an emergency stay of the Temporary Restraining Order issued by Federal Judge Robart (U.S. District Court for Western District of Washington).

Until such time as further action by a court, Judge Robart’s order barring implementation of the travel and refugee ban remains in place. Individuals from the seven countries named in the Executive Order may continue to apply for visas and admission to the United States.   In the meantime, the federal government could seek Supreme Court intervention.

NOTE: Due to the fluid nature of this situation non-immigrant students and scholars from the seven countries listed in the Executive Order should not travel out of the U.S. without consulting with an immigration attorney. Ongoing litigation could again block travel.

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February 4, 2017 

“Airlines that had been stopping travelers from boarding planes to the United States were told by the government in a conference call Friday night to begin allowing them to fly, according to a person familiar with the call but who declined to be identified because it was a private discussion. The Trump administration, however, could again block the travelers if it were to win an emergency stay.”

Judge Robart’s decision out of Washington State temporarily halts  the 90-day ban on entry of nationals from seven countries, but also the ban on refugee admissions (including Syrian refugees) and the prioritization of refugees based religion.

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On January 27, 2017, President Trump signed Executive Order 13769: Protecting the Nation from Foreign Terrorist Entry into the United States by Foreign Nationals. Section 3 of the Executive Order states the U.S. will suspend immigrant and non-immigrant (H-1B, TN, F-1, O-1, J-1 etc.) entry into the U.S. of foreign nationals from Iraq, Syria, Iran, Sudan, Somalia, Libya and Yemen for 90 days from the date of the order. Additional countries may be added and the prohibition may be extended beyond 90 days. There are limited exceptions for certain diplomatic visa classifications. In its broadest interpretation, this would include passport holders, citizens, nationals and dual nationals of Iraq, Syria, Iran, Sudan, Somalia, Libya and Yemen. At this time, those individuals who could be affected by this prohibition are advised not to travel abroad and should consult with private immigration counsel.

Note: According to a statement by the Department for Homeland Security: “Lawful Permanent Residents of the United States traveling on a valid I-551 will be allowed to board U.S. bound aircraft and will be assessed for exceptions at arrival ports of entry, as appropriate. The entry of these individuals, subject to national security checks, is in the national interest. Therefore, we expect swift entry for these individuals.” For more information, please see this DHS Factsheet.

7. Executive Orders

 

8. Additional Resources

UNC-Chapel Hill Resources

Resources from Outside Organizations